Tag Archives: Selection sort

Computer Algorithms: Bubble Sort

Overview

It’s weird that bubble sort is the most famous sorting algorithm in practice since it is one of the worst approaches for data sorting. Why is bubble sort so famous? Perhaps because of its exotic name or because it is so easy to implement. First let’s take a look on its nature.

Bubble sort consists of comparing each pair of adjacent items. Then one of those two items is considered smaller (lighter) and if the lighter element is on the right side of its neighbour, they swap places. Thus the lightest element bubbles to the surface and at the end of each iteration it appears on the top. I’ll try to explain this simple principle with some pictures.

1. Each two adjacent elements are compared

In bubble sort we've to compare each two adjacent elements
In bubble sort we've to compare each two adjacent elements

Here “2″ appears to be less than “4″, so it is considered lighter and it continues to bubble to the surface (the front of the array).
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Computer Algorithms: Insertion Sort

Overview

Sorted data can dramatically change the speed of our program, therefore sorting algorithms are something quite special in computer science. For instance searching in a sorted list is faster than searching in an unordered list.

There are two main approaches in sorting – by comparing the elements and without comparing them. A typical algorithm from the first group is insertion sort. This algorithm is very simple and very intuitive to implement, but unfortunately it is not so effective compared to other sorting algorithms as quicksort and merge sort. Indeed insertion sort is useful for small sets of data with no more than about 20 items.

Insertion sort it is very intuitive method of sorting items and we often use it when we play card games. In this case the player often gets an unordered set of playing cards and intuitively starts to sort it. First by taking a card, making some comparisons and then putting the card on the right position.

So let’s say we have an array of data. In the first step the array is unordered, but we can say that it consists of two sub-sets: sorted and unordered, where on the first step the only item in the sorted sub-set is its first item. If the length of the array is n the algorithm is considered completed in n-1 steps. On each step our sorted subset is growing with one item. The thing is that we take the first item from the unordered sub-set and with some comparisons we put it into its place in the sorted sub-set, like on the diagram bellow.

Main principle of insertion sort
Main principle of insertion sort.

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